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20120916
20120916
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that weak to ignore four assaults in benghazi in the last several weeks? does the obama administration see no evil but hear no evil? these assaults with rocket propelled grerngrenades and explosive devices foreshadowed the deadly violence that occurred on the anniversary of 9/11. oh, yes. i have seen this movie before. the obama administration apparently didn't. with them, flattery will get you everywhere. i guess they never read about the trojan horse. and this is a fox news alert. the state department is ordering that all family members and nonessential u.s. government personnel leave sudan and tunisia. get right to greg who is there. >> good evening, greg. >> hey, judge, the state department warning a u.s. citizens not to travel here to tunisia. if you are here use extreme caution . we spoke to one official and that person was cautious all of this in response of the violence that was seen here in the u.s. embassy yesterday and thousands of protestors outside of the embassy and some scaled over the wall and looted and smashing windows. no embassy staffers were hurt. four protestors kille
.s. consulate in been gaza that killed -- benghazi that killed four american citizens. the two confirmed thus far among the dead are slawn smith, an air force veteran turned information management officer and ambassador chris stevens, one of america's finest and bravest foreign service officers. i didn't know sean smith, i know he's a great american who served his country, but i had gotten to know chris stevens quite well. and ambassador chris stevens' death, the libyan people have lost a champion and believer in the peaceful aspirations of their democratic revolution. the american people have lost a selfless and dedicated servant of our interests and our values, and i have lost a friend. my thoughts and prayers today are with chris' family and the loved ones of his fallen colleagues. my god grant them comfort in their time of grief. our most urge vent -- urgent order of business is now is to ensure our citizens in libya and egypt and elsewhere across the world are safe. americans look to the government in libya and egypt and elsewhere to meet their responsibilities in this regard. we also lo
heart that i rise today to speak about the horrific attack yesterday on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that killed four american citizens. sean smith and ambassador chris stevens are among the identified. i didn't know sean smith. i know he is a great american who served his country. but i have gotten to know chris stevens quite well. in his death, the libyan people have lost a great champion and believer in the peaceful aspirations of their democratic revolution. the american people have lost a selfless and dedicated servant of our interests and our values. and i have lost a friend. my thoughts and prayers today are with chrises family and his loved ones and those of his fallen colleagues. our first order of business now is to make sure that our citizens living in libya and egypt and elsewhere across the region in the world are safe. americans look to the government in libya and egypt and elsewhere to meet their responsibilities in this regard. they also look to the libyan government to ensure that those responsible for yesterday's attack in benghazi are swiftly brought to justice. in
the murder thursday of four american diplomates. including united states ambassador chris stevens in benghazi, libya, in what officials believe was a terrorist attack designed to coincide with the anniversary of september 11th. and joining us dan henninger, mary anastasia o'grady and, with the anti-american protests across the arab world this week, tell us about our standing in that part of the world, and the ferment in arabia? >> well, i think, paul, what's happening here is where essentially we came in when the arab spring began in egy egypt, tunisia and spread to other countries and the feeling at that time that came out the united states couldn't really support any of these movements in the arab spring because quote unquote, we don't know who these people are, which is to say that the united states, and including the state department, just was not that engaged with these countries at that time. now, when you think of how, to what extent egypt or libya since these transitions have been in the news, it's been basically not at all on their own, and still a piece with the obama administration
a handwritten sign that said "thugs and killers do not represent a benghazi or islam." the president of the palestinian authority, who worked closely with chris sent me a letter of remembering his energy and integrity and deploring "an act of ugly terror." many others from across the middle east and africa have offered similar sentiments. this has been a difficult week for the state department's and for our country. we have seen the heavy assault on our post in benghazi bad took lives of those brave men. we have seen rage and violence directed at american embassies over an awful internet video that we had nothing to do it. it is hard for the american people to make sense of that because it is senseless. it is totally unacceptable. the people of egypt, libya, yemen, and tunisia did not trade the tyranny of the dictator for the tyranny of a mob. reasonable people and responsible leaders in these countries need to do everything they can to restore security and hold accountable those behind these violent acts. we will, under the president's leadership, keep taking steps to protect our pe
take. the images of the american embassy burning in benghazi might have conjured up memories of tehran in 1979,but the analogy is false. in libya, the government is not fomenting anti-americanism. it's lamb meanting it. the violence there appears to have been the work of small extremist elements that lack much popular support. but the storm has spread from libya. across the middle east there have been protests rallying against the united states and the west in general. even in these places, however, keep in mind that these crowds number in the hundreds, perhaps thousands. in countries with tens of millions of people. they make for vivid images be u they don't tell the whole story. what can we say about these places and protests? first in many of these countries, particularly those that have toppled dictatorships, the most important reality is not of bad government but of weak government. in libya, yemen, and even egypt, the state has lost its ability to control its public. in a sense, this might be progress. egypt didn't see protests like this before because mubarak's regime would arre
the benghazi consulate facility there, which is a villa, surrounded by a hedge had and iron gate, but secondarily they then went after the u.s. safe house inside benghazi where the team had evacuated to and he says that level of coordination of the attacks pointed to fact this is not a spontaneous planned attacked, but by somebody like al-qaeda. >> harris: leyland, tell me this, we can see some activity behind you, what's happening in cairo right now? >> right now, you could say it's really a tense calm here in cairo and you can feel the tension, you can also smell the tension in the tear gas and on the street and so much that they have he' burned down not quite with the gun powder here. we took a look around and at one point you might call a compound and now looks more like an armed circuit. >> and this graffiti doesn't need any translation, u.s.a go to hell and it's spray painted on what they can find, including the trees. businesses reopened after the four days of riots which you can see and feel the lingering affects and the tear gas is in the haair and it's miserable and the
definitive conclusions. our assessment at the present is in fact it began spontaneously in benghazi as a reaction to what had transpired hours earlier in cairo where, of course, as you know, there was a violent protest outside of our embassy sparked by this hateful video. but soon after that spontaneous protest began outside of our consulate in benghazi, we believe that it looks like extremist elements, individuals, joined in that effort with heavy weapons of the sort that are, unfortunately, readily now available in libya post-revolution. and that it spun from there into something much, much more violent. >> schieffer: but you do not agree with him that this was something that had been plotted out several months ago? >> we do not-- we do not have information at present that leads us to conclude this was premeditated or preplanned. >> schieffer: do you agree or disagree with him that al qaeda had some part in this? >> well, we'll have to find out that out. i think it's clear there were extremist elements that joined in and escalated the violence. whether they were al qaeda affiliate
the people in benghazi. and he said he's going kill. he was going kill. [inaudible] what do we have to do? i was no no-fly zone. i wanted i think that today in syria, it's very, very, very disappointing to see we are not doing anything. it's as if we have agreed to disagree on this and let. be the way it was with the syrians. i'm not saying we have to be passive. we have to be respectful and we should not intervene only to protect the interest in libya. it was a clear it was deal between the united states and france. i think in syria we have to care about the people being killed and not the strategic interest which is i think is the case today. >> i'm a journalist from egypt visiting d.c., and returning back again to cover the i i did i did diad.a. lem that. you said that the islamist in egypt say that the -- [inaudible] this is not the case. [inaudible] to islam and what can be solution to this gap which i think will not be solvent in the upcoming years. we will have -- problems. >> thank you. thank you for this question. first, what are you saying about the muslim hood and what was said wa
diplomates. including united states ambassador chris stevens in benghazi, libya, in what officials believe was a terrorist attack designed to coincide with the anniversary of september 11th. and joining us dan henninger, mary anastasia o'grady and, with the anti-american protests across the arab world this week, tell us about our standing in that part of the world, and the ferment in arabia? >> well, i think, paul, what's happening here is where essentially we came in when the arab spring began in egy egypt, tunisia and spread to other countries and the feeling at that time that came out the united states couldn't really support any of these movements in the arab spring because quote unquote, we don't know who these people are, which is to say that the united states, and including the state department, just was not that engaged with these countries at that time. now, when you think of how, to what extent egypt or libya since these transitions have been in the news, it's been basically not at all on their own, and still a piece with the obama administration's policy on foreign policy, to lo
, with benghazi, with so many dictators, they were supporting them because it suit at that time the strategic interests and the economic interests. so the point for me was to deal with this and to be very cautious with wording. i was not buying from the very beginning this perception, oh, it's the arab spring, these are revolutions. i started by saying let us be cautiously optimistic. something is happening which is great. and what is great is what i call in the book and in the title the awakening. and the awakening is the awakening of the arab mind and the intellectual revolution with people understanding, yes, it's possible to get rid of dictators, it's possible to change the country. this is irreversible. that cannot be chaingd. and this is something which is a legacy, a shift which is very promising for the now and for the future. now to speak about revolutions that are achieved and i don't know, i still don't know. so i don't know today if what is happening in egypt is an unfinished or an unachieved revolution. i don't know what is happening with what is happening in tunisia that we are,
in the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >> anti u.s. protests following the consulate killings have spread even further across the globe. in australia, hundreds of protesters demonstrated outside of the american consulate in sydney. and the middle east, thousands of muslims have taken to the streets. fbi officials investigating the killings fact of their visit until the volatile region and safer. >> members of the security council to condemn in the strongest terms the series of violent attacks against embassies and consulates premises of member states in multiple locations. >> protesters are raging over an anti islam film this american filmmaker has that out he has been interviewed by authorities and in his weekly address, the president's promised justice for those who killed the u.s. ambassador to bolivia and three other americans at the consulate. >> there's never any justification for violence. there is no religion at condones the targeting of innocent man and woman. there's no excuse for attacks on our embassies and and consul >> some say that tuesday's attack was planned. >> it was a
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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